Colorado DBH Prevention Health Communications, In the News for 1/18/2011

Source: DBH email, 1/20/2011

Attached is the January 18, 2011 edition of the DBH Prevention Community Programs, Prevention Health Communications, In the News and Resources weekly.

In the News is a collection of hyperlinks to current prevention articles, broadcasts, reports, press releases, funding announcements, conferences and events, training and more that are relevant to the prevention and reduction of the use of alcohol and other drugs.

Contents include stories on the following topics:

  • National Health Awareness
  • General
  • Disparities/Poverty
  • Education
  • Healthcare
  • Healthcare Reform
  • Alcohol
  • Marijuana
  • Tobacco
  • Prescription Drugs
  • Other Substances
  • Suicide
  • Violence
  • Mental Health
  • Obesity
  • Technology

Click here to access Prevention Health Communications, In the News and Resources weekly, 1/18/2011 (pdf)

Advertisements

Colorado DBH Prevention Health Communications, In the News for 9/20/10

Source: DBH email, 9/20/2010

Attached is the September 20, 2010 edition of the DBH Prevention Community Programs, Prevention Health Communications, In the News and Resources weekly.

In the News is a collection of hyperlinks to current prevention articles, broadcasts, reports, press releases, funding announcements, conferences and events, training and more that are relevant to the prevention and reduction of the use of alcohol and other drugs.

Contents include stories on the following topics:

  • National Awareness
  • General
  • Alcohol
  • Tobacco
  • Prescription Drugs
  • Other Drugs/Substances
  • Mental Health
  • Suicide
  • Violence
  • Education
  • Technology
  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Health Care/Health Policy
  • Coalition Building
  • Contest

Attachments:

  1. Click here to access Prevention Health Communications, In the News and Resources weekly, 9/20/2010 (pdf)

Colorado statewide medication disposal day: 9/25/10

Source: email distribution list, 8/4/2010

From Beverly Gmerek, Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Program Coordinator:

We are pleased to announce that the Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention program, Rx Drugs Not Yours Not Safe, a program of Peer Assistance Services, Inc. is partnering with the Colorado Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) office in hosting a statewide medication disposal day on September 25, 2010. This is part of DEA’s National Pharmaceutical Take-Back Day occurring in communities across the country.

  • This is an opportunity to make a difference in your community and safely dispose of old medications in an environmentally-friendly way.
  • The DEA will be working with local law enforcement officials to collect and dispose of the medications
  • The DEA will cover all the expenses related to the proper disposal and destruction.
  • In 2008, 562 Coloradans died from abuse of prescription drugs, three times more than those who died in drunken driving-related crashes (173) the same year.
  • 20% to 30% of high school students report using prescription drugs that were not prescribed to them; the mostly obtained from friends and family medicine cabinets.

DEA has invited all Colorado sheriff departments, police departments and drug task forces to participate.  The deadline for registering to participate is August 11, 2010. Please contact your local law enforcement agency and let them know how important it is that they participate and your ability to be of assistance.

What an ideal time to educate your community about the dangers of abusing medications and how to properly safeguard them.

Here is how we can help you:

  • The RxDrugsNotYoursNotSafe.org site will have downloadable posters and fact sheets soon.
  • Locations of all the disposal sites will be listed on the site as they become available.
  • Please join our NEW Face book page Rx Drugs Not Yours Not Safe for the most up to date information about this event.

The Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention program is a State Priority Initiative funded by the Colorado Division of Behavioral Health.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

And thank you for making a difference!

Beverly Gmerek
Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Program Coordinator
www.RxDrugsNotYoursNotSafe.org

Other resources:

Updated: DBH In the News (pdf works now)

Sorry, the pdf in the previous post did not have active links.  You can revisit the previous post, or click here to access the file.

Colorado HB 1352: Concerning Changes to Crimes Involving Controlled Substances

The following is a legislative summary of HB10-1352, a drug sentencing reform bill.  The summary is from The Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition (CCJRC), a group that helped develop the bill as part of the drug policy taskforce of  the  Colorado Commission on Criminal & Juvenile Justivce.

Click here for recent news on HB 1352 from Google.
Click here to see legislative tracking information for HB10-1352

Source:  CCJRC email, 2/24/10

HB 1352: Concerning Changes to Crimes Involving Controlled Substances
Sponsors: Representative Mark Waller (R-Colorado Springs) and Senators Pat Steadman (D-Denver) and Shawn Mitchell (R-Broomfield) with cosponsors Representatives Pace (D-Pueblo), Court (D-Denver), Gardner B. (R-Colorado Springs), Gerou (R-Jefferson County), Kagan (D-Denver), King S. (R-Grand Junction), Levy (D-Boulder), Looper (R-El Paso), Massey (R-Poncha Springs), May (R-Douglas), McCann (D-Denver), Miklosi (D-Denver), Nikkel (R-Loveland), Roberts (R-Durango), Ryden (D-Arapahoe), Stephens (R-Colorado Springs) and Senators M. Carroll (D-Aurora), Hudak (D-Jefferson), Morse (D-Colorado Springs), Newell (D-Littleton), Penry (R-Grand Junction), White (R-Garfield/Eagle).

This drug sentencing reform bill is based on recommendations approved by the Commission on Criminal & Juvenile Justice. After reviewing the drug laws, practices, and research, the Commission concluded that drug laws and strategies would be improved by more clearly differentiating between those drug offenders who are primarily users and addicts from the more serious offenders who engage in the crimes of distribution, manufacturing and trafficking of drugs.

For those drug offenders who are primarily users and addicts, the Commission determined that intervention and treatment in the community would be a more effective use of resources than the current escalating system of punishment that often results in a prison sentence. For these offenders, it was recognized that the current structure and approach to prosecuting these drug crimes is frequently ineffective in reducing recidivism and curbing addiction and that a primary omission from current law is a means of assuring prompt and effective treatment of drug offenders.

The Commission also determined that penalties for several drug distribution offenses should be increased and that two provisions of the special drug offender statute should be clarified.

What the Bill Does:

Drug possession offenses

  • Creates a separate statute for the crime of possession of drugs.
  • Reduces the crime of drug use from a class 6 felony to a misdemeanor
  • Redefines the quantity of drugs that is considered “simple possession” from 1 gram or less to 4 grams or less of a schedule I or II drug   and 2 grams or less of methamphetamine. “Simple possession” would be a class 6 felony.
  • Standardizes that possession for personal use of amounts greater than “simple possession” quantities is a class 4 felony.
  • Reduces possession of schedule III-V drugs (i.e. prescription drugs) to a misdemeanor.
  • Reduces the penalty for fraud and deceit in connection with controlled substances from a class 5 to a class 6 felony.
  • Requires cost savings from this bill to be evaluated annually by the division of criminal justice and reported to the legislature and that some of the cost savings will be allocated to expand and enhance substance abuse treatment.

If there is evidence that even small quantities of drugs are possessed with the intent to distribute, prosecutors can still file a criminal charge of drug distribution at any quantity of drugs.

Offenses related to marijuana

  • Redefines the quantity of marijuana possession that determines crime classifications at various levels including possession of under 2 ounces (petty offense), possession of between 2 – 6 ounces (class 2 misdemeanor), possession of between 6-12 ounces (class 1 misdemeanor), and possession of over 12 ounces (class 6 felony).
  • Redefines the quantity of marijuana concentrate possession that determines crime classification at various levels including possession of under 3 ounces (class 1 misdemeanor) and possession of over 3 ounces (class 6 felony).
  • Creates a graduated penalty for marijuana cultivation including cultivation of less than 6 plants (class 1 misdemeanor), cultivation of between 7-29 plants (class 5 felony) and cultivation of 30 or more plants (class 4 felony).

Increasing penalties for drug distribution

  • Creates a new crime of distribution of schedule I or II drugs by an adult to a minor (class 3 felony) and if the adult is more than 2 years older than the minor, imposes a mandatory minimum prison sentence.
  • Increases the crime level to a class 3 felony and imposes a mandatory minimum prison sentence for distribution (even without remuneration) of marijuana or marijuana concentrate by an adult to a minor less than 15 years old.
  • Increases the crime classification for distribution of ketamine (aka “date rape drug”) to a class 3 felony.

Clarifies two provisions within the Special Offender drug law (enhanced sentencing 8-48 years)

  • Requires the quantity of drugs to be greater than the “simple possession” amount to be considered importation of drugs into the state.
  • Enhances sentences when a deadly weapon is on a defendant’s person or his within immediate reach, when a firearm is within the defendant’s or confederate’s access in a manner that posed a risk to others or when a firearm is in a vehicle the defendant was occupying.

Colo. Sentencing Reform Bill Has Bipartisan Support

Source: JoinTogether News Summary, 2/24/10

A bill that would cut sentences for drug offenses and put more money into addiction treatment programs has support from both sides of the aisle in the Colorado statehouse.

The Colorado Springs Gazette reported Feb. 23 that the bill from Rep. Mark Waller would make most drug-possession and drug-use crimes either misdemeanors or minor felonies. Some of the money saved due to less incarceration of drug offenders would be used to fund addiction-treatment programs. The legislation was the result of a series of sentencing-reform discussions sponsored by the state’s Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice.

Waller, a Republican and former prosecutor, has won support for HB-1352 from Colorado Attorney General John Suthers, most GOP lawmakers, and some influential Democratic leaders. “This isn’t something the Democrats can do alone because they don’t want to appear soft on crime,” Waller said.

Click here to see legislative tracking information for HB10-1352

Colorado DBH: notification of upcoming RFP for Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Federal Block Grant Prevention

The Department of Human Services (CDHS), Division of Procurement, will issue three Requests for Proposals (RFPs) for the benefit of the Division of Behavioral Health Community Prevention Programs in mid-January, 2010.

The general announcement of anticipation of releaseof a new RFP is available online at:
https://www.gssa.state.co.us/BdSols.nsf/OByCats/58376f180d9ae58e872576890073a9bd?OpenDocument